I grew up in a little town in South Carolina that had a drive-in theater.  But, mind you, not a regular drive-in.  This one was special.  When my mother and my aunt drove in, my cousin and I were hidden under blankets in the back seat.  Why?  Because it showed those movies.  You know, the ones where someone moves into a new neighborhood and is greeted by the Welcome Wagon.  Before you could get back to the car with popcorn, the now naked new neighbor, the Welcome Wagon, the Postman, and the movers were grinding and grubbing all over the screen. 

(Try telling 2 pre-teen girls to sleep through that.  Also, try to explain why the forbidden children who were told to sleep were sent for the popcorn and returned with it without anyone calling the cops or Social Services.)    

The grubbing and grinding follies, if on a page instead of a movie screen, would be in the category "adults only."  I get that.  What I don't get is where the boundary begins.  When exactly does romance enter the "adults only" category?  Brotherly Love  and E-mail Enticement  both venture beyond the bedroom door.  In fact, both describe the physical encounters in graphic and - I hope - arousing, enticing and alluring detail.  Brotherly  contains a scene in a bordello with one man and several "ladies of the evening."   Neither book contains sharing of their coupling by the focal pair nor (darn it) bondage, sex toys, or overly unusual forms or foibles.  Does the writer's intent make the difference or does it take something more?  Help me out - what makes a book fit the adult only category?

By the way, I've categorized both Brotherly and E-mail  as adult only.  Does anyone have an idea whether that helps or hurts sales?  When I check out my books in the e-tailers, some (most) of the others in the same section make my stuff look and sound pretty tame.  So I got to wondering -- am I in the wrong neighborhood?

I'd appreciate someone getting out the clue gun and pointing it in my direction.

3

Amazon introduced the Kindle and it became the new "must have."  The device seems to be on permanent back-order, a status that didn't change even when Amazon announced it was about to introduce the Kindle 2.  Other companies, like Sony, have e-readers too, but it's Amazon that led the charge into a brave new world.  It was Amazon that told authors that if we wanted to publish our work, just upload it and they'd make it available on their site to all those Kindle owners. 

Wait -- there's a way to get my work out there and off my hard-drive without spending a fortune to self-publish?  I can, gulp, make my work available to actual readers?

As my husband would say --- CUE MR. BRICK!!!

Okay, I know that Amazon didn't introduce e-publishing.  It just gave it feet.  With the growing number of Kindle owners, soon, e-publishing may run.  When the app becomes widely available for cell phones, e-publishing may take wings and fly.  The possibilities percolated in my disturbed little brain and one day I turned to my hubby the computer guy and said - Give me a book cover

The first book I ever wrote, the one I wrote before I had any concept of the tight little rules in what the majors will and won't publish (Brotherly Love) became my first Kindle book.  After I uploaded it, I discovered the Mobipocket forum that formats and distributes e-books for PC and other online e-publishers to a list of great e-tailers. 

I wasn't surprised to read my Mobi contract (I am a lawyer) and learn that AMAZON OWNS MOBI.  So,  one writer who appreciates Amazon for being far-sighted enough to give everyone a forum and let the buyers decide what they want gives three cheers for Amazon.  Yip, yip, yipee!

Today the Kindle and Mobi, and tomorrow - the world.  The possibilities are endless, now that I've opened my eyes to see them.  Maybe it was all the publicity surrounding the new Kindle launch or maybe, it was a conspiracy between my hubby and his co-hort in crime, Mr. Brick.